Poetry

You are your own poetry machine!

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We can all be poets and linguistic warriors. And if we can win our wars for the liberation of language we can win something else in the bargain: The ability to express ourselves again. Or at least have fun trying.

The Invisible Deers

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By Miah Artola Once I smoked cigarettes in secret and once I was in the courtyard of a monastery with a statue of Buddha glowing grey under the…

I Know a Man

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by Robert Creeley ~ détourned by Steve Finbow As I sd to my   friend, because I am   always talking,—Jorn, I sd, which was not his   name, the…

City of Personal Mythologies

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We know that patriarchy and its neoliberal offspring have destroyed the planet and quite nearly destroyed us, and we know that the answer to this path of destruction lies in unlocking the secrets of the brujas and the xamans and connecting with Mother Earth and tuning our lives to Her.

the final historian, the final cultural avatar

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There’s a plight being delivered. She has a fetish for being the final historian, the final cultural avatar, she feeds the need and hence must take the persona of goddess, a tragedian and cremator of worlds. In a world of diffracted male fact she becomes a curator of new worlds. It’s a heavy responsibility bearing distress, loneliness as well as good bourn. She builds using memory, imagination and exterior English, that is, a language that remains out of touch with both itself and her cerebral thoughts. The collection reads like a long message in a bottle, from someone who lives elsewhere, and knows more than what would be found in a normal message or letter.

Yes, Yes, Yes—After the Flood.

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The texts are multidimensional throughout, leaping off the page, not nestling comfortably within the whiteness, ‘sculptures that looked nothing like words’ as Anonymous states or words that burn and dance as Tanya Zeifer intones. There is Blakean joy and mysticism in these works, fused with a synchronic understanding of language in the internet era.